Tips for Photographing Alaska Wildlife

Photographing Alaska wildlife is a rewarding experience, its also a challenging one. Alaska is a big place, access to remote locations can be riddled with finicky weather. But these are components that are common to the amateur and professional photographer alike.

Persistence and patience, scouting, and good planning are essential ingredients, and they will pay off in the end. I composed a few tips below for an article some time ago, but have expanded on them. Things to consider before embarking on a trip to photograph Alaska wildlife.

1) Choose the appropriate personal gear

Dress appropriately and have your camera gear well packed and prepared for the type of travel, hiking or trekking necessary for the task. This is a significant issue in Alaska due to the widely varying weather. Depending on the season, weather can be extreme, and extremely variable. In the summer, whenever I travel to mountain country, I usually have both a pair of shorts and a down jacket along. Days can be hot, but I’ve been snowed on in every month of the year. So, things of great value are down sweaters, rain pants, wind/rain jacket, light gloves, hat, and good merino wool base layer clothing.

Minus 40 below zero, freezes remote plastic cord for camera, Fairbanks, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Minus 40 below zero, freezes remote plastic cord for camera, Fairbanks, Alaska. (© Hugh Rose)


Me with a 60+ pound backpack in the Arrigetch Peaks (© Amy Johnson)


2) Choose the appropriate camera gear

This will vary based on the subject you are targeting. The more general you go, the more gear you are likely to need. This is often the case for me, I have lenses from 14mm to 500mm in my bag, along with a tripod or two. As for the correct camera bag….well, there isn’t one.  However, there is one that will best suit your specific trip. I’m fond of the Kiboko bag by Gura Gear. I like what it does not include as much as what it does include. It is light and rugged. It is a little shy on extra space for carrying clothing, etc., on a long day trek, but I’ve shoved it full and got by o.k. As my years accumulate, I become more fond of slimming down on gear to reduce the overall weight I carry on a daily basis. Carbon fiber tripods, light but tough camera bags, newer lenses that are lighter, it all ads up. But it is true, you pay dearly for the absence of a few pounds in gear in general.

Camera gear in Kiboko bag


3) Get in shape

Get in reasonable shape for the physical demands that await you. One could take this to the extreme, but the general rule is to avoid the recovery phase that often follows the first few days of high activity, or doing tasks not common to your daily routine. So if you are going to be packing your camera bag on 5 mile treks each day looking for wildlife, make sure to do this a few times before your departure and you will be in a better place to take advantage of all opportunities, and you wont be reaching for Ibuprofen as often.

Photographer silhouetted against the sky in Denali National Park. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Photographer silhouetted against the sky in Denali National Park. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


4) Research your subject

Know your subject. Understand and respect a comfortable working distance from the wildlife you seek to photograph. Do a little reading and research on your targeted species. Most animals are creatures of habit, and they frequent similar areas and can be somewhat predictable. It takes a little time however to discern and anticipate their movements. The more you know about them, the better situated you are. Be a keen observer when you are with them in the field. Be careful of proximity, especially to habituated animals. You can tell if you are too close to a subject, whether it feels comfortable with your presence. Some National Parks (like Denali National Park) have guidelines on minimum distances from various species, you need to be apprised of these. Brown bears or grizzly bears inhabit much of Alaska, and if you are camping, cooking, eating, you need to be careful and informed on the protocol for good camp and food etiquette in bear country.

An inquisitve short-eared owl stares intently while standing on the a surface on Alaska's arctic north slope. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

An inquisitve short-eared owl stares intently while standing on the a surface on Alaska’s arctic north slope. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


5) Work with the light

If possible, scout the area ahead of time and know the lighting conditions: when, where and how the morning and evening light and shadows fall. This is somewhat obvious, but also difficult. Weather in the mountain country is often cloudy and you don’t have that luxury to predict where light will fall. But do not underestimate the value of really exploring the light. You know, it is what makes those outrageous images. There is simply no way around it. Check out my blog post on IPhone apps, there is a great one called Focalware that will tell you sunrise and sunset times based on lat and long coordinates. This is very valuable. Additionally, the sun in Alaska is at extreme angles, especially near the summer and winter solstice. Where it appears in the sky is important, especially to landscape photography. Perpendicular light, or some degree of angle creates dimension. If you are in a mountain range that spans an east to west orientation, you are likely to be shooting in front light during the golden hour, which is terrible, even though the golden color is beautiful. Research your spacial orientation.

Brown bear walks along the shores of Naknek lake just before sunrise in Katmai National Park, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Brown bear walks along the shores of Naknek lake just before sunrise in Katmai National Park, Alaska.(© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


Brown bear wades in the Brooks river, morning sunrise over the Brooks river and Naknek lake, Katmai National Park, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Brown bear wades in the Brooks river, morning sunrise over the Brooks river and Naknek lake, Katmai National Park, Alaska. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


6) Use a tripod if necessary

This will help in tracking and following moving wildlife. Please, do yourself a huge favor and get a good tripod and a good ballhead. And yes, they are ridiculously expensive, I know. Believe me I know, I own many. But they are a very critical element in your gear line up. A few companies that offer these are Really Right Stuff and Kirk Enterprises. Gitzo and Bogen offer tripods, you could probably trade in your car for a nice Gitzo carbon fiber tripod! With maybe enough cash back to get a good ballhead too! After having said that, you don’t need the biggest, heaviest tripod out there. I have moved towards much smaller, lightweight versions, especially for landscape photography, and in particular in conjunction with the Image Stabilization lens options. Use a tripod when necessary, but don’t be anchored and made unproductive by being chained to it. I shoot my 500mm canon hand held all the time, and the images are impeccably sharp. It is possible with a little technique.

One of my favorite mini tripods when I need to travel light in the back country. Yes, I use my big glass, sometimes the 500mm, on this little tripod. It is not conventional wisdom in the photo world, but it works great for me.


7) Consider perspective

An Eye level position will help portray a more natural scene of the animal in its environment. But there is more to consider than just a straight on shot to your subject. Be creative. You might need to shoot laying on your belly, or climb up on a ladder, in a tree, or whatever, but do what it takes to make the perspective look natural and interesting.

Arctic fox in white winter coat rests in a snowdrift along a lake in Alaska's arctic north slope. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Arctic fox in white winter coat rests in a snowdrift along a lake in Alaska’s arctic north slope. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


Red salmon or "sockeye" in spawning phase (red body and green head) in a small stream in the Alaska mountains. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Red salmon or “sockeye” in spawning phase (red body and green head) in a small stream in the Alaska mountains. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


8 Avoid tunnel vision

Repeat, beware of tunnel vision. This is a bad habit easily acquired when shooting moving subjects, especially with the long, telephoto lenses common in wildlife photography. One tends to just aim and shoot and not really evaluate the composition. The result is that you end up with your subject centered in every frame. It is not easy, but try to anticipate your subjects movements and therefore bring some element of space and composition to your frame. If possible, occasionally examine the full frame area of your image. Experiment with focus points that are not just the center one. You are not just target shooting, you are, or should be composing. It is a challenge, especially with active moving subjects and attempting to keep your auto focus targeted correctly. Think about your subject, but think about the space around it also, and…shoot a lot!

Bull muskox on the snow covered tundra of the arctic north slope, Alaska (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Bull muskox on the snow covered tundra of the arctic north slope, Alaska. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


Bull caribou, rangifer tarandus, prances across the tundra north of the Brooks range, Arctic, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Bull caribou, rangifer tarandus, prances across the tundra north of the Brooks range, Arctic, Alaska. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


9) Work fast

Have extra film, digital media or batteries readily accessible should a quick change be necessary. If you plan to work from a tripod with a long lens, then practice and be fast and efficient with its use. Know the necessary functions on your camera to make quick changes, like focus points, focus methods, exposure compensation, etc. Get a system that allows access to a second lens or possibly second body and lens together. Sometimes you find an animal makes a closer approach than expected and your long glass is just that – too long, and you miss an interesting shot due to lack of the proper lens.

10) Experiment and broaden

Use telephoto frames, but back off to capture the animal in its environment, too. Context means a lot, and can say much. Step back and look around you. Attempt to place the animal in a space, in time and place. Include some of it’s environment that helps tell the story of where it lives.

Western arctic caribou herd migrates in the Utukok uplands, National Petroleum Reserve Alaska, Arctic, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Western arctic caribou herd migrates in the Utukok uplands, National Petroleum Reserve Alaska, Arctic, Alaska. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


Female grizzly bear basks in the morning sun near a small tundra pond in Denali National Park, Alaska, snow covered Alaska mountain range in the distance. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Female grizzly bear basks in the morning sun near a small tundra pond in Denali National Park, Alaska, snow covered Alaska mountain range in the distance. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


11) Blend patience and persistence

Do your best to blend enjoying being out in the natural world with the sheer persistence and patience often necessary to capture the image. Wildlife photography often includes down time while waiting for the subject or the weather, or both! Some people have a greater tolerance for waiting, and it helps if you anticipate this and consider ways you can keep yourself occupied. That might be reading a book, (your camera manual for example), hiking, watching other subjects…whatever it is, it does help to anticipate it and be prepared.

12) Be weather-wise

Inclement weather can provide situations for spectacular photos. They offer mood and feeling. Dress appropriately and go out in the dramatic weather as well as the good weather.

Cow moose in winter snowstorm. Denali National Park, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Cow moose in winter snowstorm. Denali National Park, Alaska. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


13) Get up early, stay up late

If you happen to have the ability to sleep anywhere, anytime. Good for you, I’m envious. Generally, shooting in Alaska, in particular the summer season, the light never ends. Furthermore, the golden hour becomes a very late, and very early experience. You simply have to stay up late, and get up early to get this quality of light. In the high arctic, I’ve had to switch my entire sleep schedule and start shooting around 10pm and end about 5am, crawling in a tent with hopes to catch enough sleep to be refreshed for the next day. Consider where you are traveling in Alaska, and what the sunrise, sunset times are for that location and time of year, it varies considerably.

Morning sunrise at high alpine tundra campsite in Gates of the Arctic National park, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

5:30 AM August morning sunrise at a high alpine tundra campsite in Gates of the Arctic National park, Alaska. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


Midnight sun along the Nigu river, Brooks range, arctic, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

12:30 AM, midnight sun along the Nigu river, Brooks range, arctic, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska. (© Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

  • Hello and I must say nice site!!! I am coming to Alaska in a week and I realize now that I should have looked a little sooner for hot spots. I am coming with my girlfriends family and I am bringing Canon digital equipt. to shoot with. I was wondering because we are going to Denali area, where and what to see. I am not the tourist-guide kind of person. I was raised in Washington state but now live in Florida. I have children here or else I would have traveled to and probably stayed in Alaska. If you have a quick minute to give me some advice, if not I understand. I envy you and your opportunities as a photographer. I spoke with Art Wolfe once and should have persued his advice , but again my kids have come first. I look forward to reading more of your advice and will be amazed I’m sure at the realness that pictures cannot capture, when I am there. Best regards, Jim Johnson

    • James, I’m just back in america after some travels so it may be a little late, but in a very general way of advice:
      The park entrance area is usually good for moose. Mile 38 to mile 65 or so is good for bears. And the wonder lake area at the end of the park is great for landscapes. And of course, lots in between. Good luck.

  • Mr. Jayant

    Thanks…..its a very helpful tips…

    I learnt the basic photography rules from Mr. Kishore Mamillapalli who is one of the leading wildlife photographers from South Africa. He used to say that “Beauty truly is in the eye of the beholder”. If you like what you see on your camera screen, or through the viewfinder, you will like the photograph.

    There are some basic photography rules for composition. Once you know these rules, you can use them, ignore them, or break them. Follow your gut, and you will end up with spectacular, sometimes breathtaking results. Kishore is really an astonishing wild life photographer and has a great eye for details..

  • Fantastic site, most impressive!!! I’m heading to alaska for the first time in a onth, i’ll try to reach you via phone…
    Thks don

  • matt ahangi

    i’ve been reading and enjoying your articles in conjunction to a trip i’m taking to kenai peninsula next week. this is going to be my third visit to kenai peninsula. i picked up digital photography a couple of years ago (still learning enthusiastically) and i’m bringing my gear this time and hoping to get lucky while on excursions. i’m heading out for a bear watching trip on wednesday, i believe big river lake…we are going to fly over from soldotna and then we are going to be on a boat watching the bears. i know it’s not ideal but that’s the best i could do considering circumstances.
    i’m bringing two bodies: 5d ii (just added it for this trip), 7d, 16-35mm, 24-70mm, 50mm, 70-200mm and 1.4x. i wanted to ask if you could advise on how to put the two bodies in good use with two different lenses.

    • Matt,
      Basically, it depends on your situation and circumstances. Having two bodies is an excellent idea and allows you to make use of easily acquired variations of a scene. As far as what lens you have on depends on the situation. If you are shooting bears, the 70-200 w/1.4 and the 24-70 seem like a good start. You can shoot tight, or wider if necessary. Good luck.

  • matt ahangi

    thank you so much…i am very excited:-)

  • Ruta Kalmankar

    I am going to Alaska in July 2013. i need some more tips about photography.

  • Ruta Kalmankar

    I am going to Alaska in July 2013.

  • feeling like a school girl waiting for my phone to ring 😉 wink!
    fantastic images

  • This pictures are amazing, and provided tips will come in handy elsewhere too. I hope that I will have the opportunity someday to visit this beautiful country. TY

  • David

    I’d like to ask your advice. I’m going to be in Alaska for about 3 weeks in June/July and will be renting a motorhome to see and photograph the great outdoors. Would you recommend some places to go, (for pics) and would you advise a camera backpack as opposed to a typical backpack. I’m in excellent physical shape and can handle the hiking. I’m going to begin in Denali NP and end up on Kodiak Island before my flight home. Going to put in some white water rafting as well. Thanks for the website and seeing Alaska through your glass.

    David